First Impressions: Haroun and the Sea of Stories

Originally, I was excited to learn that we were assigned a Salman Rushdie book for summer reading. The first time I read a Rushdie book was in third grade: Luka and the Fire of Life (which I learned is actually a sequel to Haroun… oops.). My first impressions of this book were quite similar to with Luka. The writing style is very off-putting at first, and the eccentric fantasy plot is hard to follow at times and can become convoluted– however, Rushdie never fails to create colorful, intricate characters that really come to life on the pages. I really enjoyed reading a fun, short children’s book as a sort of break from all the textbook reading we had to do. And the great thing about Salman Rushdie is he can’t just write a children’s book and leave it at that- there’s always deeper meaning that you’ll only understand when you’re older. Of course, I’ll go more into that in later posts.

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Throughout the book, I’ll be analyzing Haroun (which, by the way, you can buy here) through the lens of the monomyth, otherwise known as the Hero’s Journey. The Hero’s Journey is used to describe a common narrative pattern in a book’s plot. Below is the cycle:

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And a cute comic that also describes the process:

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For now, I am only analyzing chapters one through three, so of course, the Hero’s Journey plot isn’t very far along. However, one thing my group and I found interesting was the matriarchial role Haroun’s mother, Soraya, played in the novel. She acted as a tipping point for the plot: all was well and fine in Perfectville until Haroun’s mother abandoned them. This is what leads to Rashid losing his storytelling abilities, which leads to Haroun going on a mission to get his abilities back, and so on. This leads us to the question: what really is Haroun’s call to adventure? Is it when he realizes everything went wrong after his mother left? Is it when he realizes on the train that everything is his fault, and he must set out to fix it? Or is it when he sees the Water Genie? We couldn’t decide on an exact answer, but we agreed that it was a combination of Everything Going Wrong that culminated in his call to adventure.

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The role of parents in Haroun brought me upon an interesting line:

“This is an affair of the heart.” (pg. 43)

This simple, sweet line struck me for a few reasons. Once I thought about it, this novel isn’t only a silly fantasy: it’s a love story. But not the Hollywood boy-saves-girl love story: it’s one about the love between a son and his father, and the father’s love for his wife. While there are high-paced adventure scenes, the princess in her castle scenes, and stories about the importance of friendship, above all, it’s about how the son loves his father so much that he’s willing to risk his life just to make him happy again, which is one of the most striking things about Haroun.

Signing out,

T

Note: follow my “Haroun and the Sea of Stories” tag to follow my updates throughout the book. 

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